Learn More About Scottish Drums

Many people often ask “what is the difference between the snare drum, the big drum and the other drum!?”.  Well, each of the drums within the pipe band has a unique role and function.

The Scottish Side Drum ( also known as the scottish snare drum, the high tension side drum or the pipe band snare) is the high-pitched drum with a very high-tension system.  The top head is made of Kevlar (Remo Cyber max and the Andante Core Tec are the two main brands) and the bottom head is made of mylar(Remo Ambassador is the main brand).  The key drum manufacturers are Andante Percussion, Pearl and Premier. They all make a great drum but they all offer different benefits. 

The Scottish Tenor Drum is a much lower and richer sounding drum than the side drum. It is also played with different mallets (the TyFry Tenor Mallet is the most commonly played mallet universally) that produce a much softer and more subtle sound.  Tenor drummers also create a very cool visual effect by flourishing or “twirling” the sticks. Check out this video to see for yourself.  Both the top and bottom head are made from mylar (Remo PowerMax and Aquarian Hosbilt are the main brands).

The Scottish Bass Drum – this is a much larger (usually 28″ by 16″) drum and produces a very rich and deep sound in comparison to the other drums.  Again, this drum is played with a mallet – much softer than the side drum sticks.  The Bass drum is considered the “heart-beat” of the band. Both heads are also made of mylar and are often decorated with logos.  Hosbilt, Andante, Pearl and Premier all manufacture quality bass drums.

To find out more about pipe band drumming please contact james@come2drum.com or visit www.come2drum.com 

There are also some learning options for those of you who would like to learn Scottish Drumming.  You can download the “Guide to Pipe Band Snare Drumming” instantly from www.come2drum.com

So what is available to those who want to learn more about Scottish drumming?

Learn Pipe Band Drumming Book and MP3′s – Available as an INSTANT DOWNLOAD or a hard copy book. The perfect start for any snare drummer. Whether you are an absolute beginner, an intermediate player trying to improve the basics, or a drummer with a different background dabbling in scottish drumming for the first time, this 65 page e-book and 43 track MP3 accompaniment outlines snare drumming from the very basics of learning how to hold the stick, understanding basic theory, developing basic rhythms, mastering the essential rudiments and learning your first drum settings.

Scottish Drum Scores to Download –

The collection of pipe band drum scores are all composed by James Laughlin.  James focusses strongly on the ensemble aspect of composition, all drum scores match and enhance the bagpipe melody to offer the listener a balance of excitement and swing. Click on your favourite pipe band drum score and have it instantly in your inbox with a clearly written drum score, and a high quality recording!

Free Pipe Band Drum Socres –  Enjoy 100 + Free Scottish drum scores at http://www.come2drum.com

Online Pipe Band Drumming Lessons – Scottish drumming lessons available to anyone in the World who wants to enjoy quality tuition from a World Champion drummer.   The drumming lessons are performed over Skype with web cam and mic – the results have been amazing!

You can also check out the following Youtube, Twitter and Facebook pages to keep you informed with information about Scottish drumming and the Pipe Band scene :

C2D Scottish Drumming Facebook Page

C2D Scottish Drumming Youtube Channel

C2D Scottish Drumming Twitter Page

Brought to you by http://www.come2drum.com

– Your Pipe Band Drumming Supplier and Educator

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